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ID:981 Albumin
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DescriptionAlbumin is measured as part of LFT & Ca/bone profiles.
IndicationHalf-life ~20 days. Factors which affect albumin levels include rate of synthesis, rate of catabolism, changes in plasma volume and the size of the extravascular pool. Hospitalised patients tend to have low albumins. Hypoalbuminaemia can be due to compromised synthesis (e.g liver disease), reduced protein uptake, elevated catabolism (e.g burns), malabsorption (e.g Crohn's) and proteinuria due to nephrotic syndrome. Albumin maintains the oncotic pressure and hypoalbuminaemia can result in oedema. LIVER DISEASE: Normal albumin makes diagnosis of cirrhosis unlikely; low levels are unlikely in acute viral hepatitis; associated diseases may render measurement of serum albumin useless. INFLAMMATORY DISEASE: Albumin is a negative acute phase reactant and serum levels may fall due to transfer to extravascular space. OEDEMA: Most cases of oedema are associated with reduced levels of albumin but very low levels may indicate that the hypoalbuminaemia is the cause of the oedema. MALIGNANCY: Albumin levels are low in cases of malignancy for a variety of reasons. Albumin is a useful indicator of prognosis in myeloma. MALNUTRITION: Severe cases can result in low levels of albumin.
Additional InfoAlbumin is a carbohydrate free protein which constitutes 55-65% of total plasma protein. It maintains oncotic plasma pressure and is involved in the storage and transport of a wide variety of ligands and is a source of endogenous amino acids. Albumin binds and solubilises various compounds eg bilirubin, Ca and LCFA. Albumin is also capable of binding toxic heavy metals as well as numerous pharmaceuticals which is the reason why low albumin concentrations in blood have a significant effect on pharmacokinetics.
Concurrent Testsna
Dietary Requirementsna
InterpretationHalf-life ~20 days. Factors which affect albumin levels include rate of synthesis, rate of catabolism, changes in plasma volume and the size of the extravascular pool. Hospitalised patients tend to have low albumins. Hypoalbuminaemia can be due to compromised synthesis (e.g liver disease), reduced protein uptake, elevated catabolism (e.g burns), malabsorption (e.g Crohn's) and proteinuria due to nephrotic syndrome. Albumin maintains the oncotic pressure and hypoalbuminaemia can result in oedema. LIVER DISEASE: Normal albumin makes diagnosis of cirrhosis unlikely; low levels are unlikely in acute viral hepatitis; associated diseases may render measurement of serum albumin useless. INFLAMMATORY DISEASE: Albumin is a negative acute phase reactant and serum levels may fall due to transfer to extravascular space. OEDEMA: Most cases of oedema are associated with reduced levels of albumin but very low levels may indicate that the hypoalbuminaemia is the cause of the oedema. MALIGNANCY: Albumin levels are low in cases of malignancy for a variety of reasons. Albumin is a useful indicator of prognosis in myeloma. MALNUTRITION: Severe cases can result in low levels of albumin.

DepartmentBiochemistry
SampleBlood
TubeSerum or Heparin
Tube Picture
Collection ConditionsNo restrictions. Use Gold top (serum gel) tube except for Intensive care units, renal unit, transplant unit, patients on IV heparin (use Green/Yellow top tube for these patients).
Min. Vol 1mL
Freq.

Ref. Range (Male)33-48
Ref. Range (Female)33-48
Ref. Range (Paed)see info below
Ref. Range Notes
Unitsg/L
IP Acute TATRefer to Website
IP Routine TATRefer to Website
GP Acute TAT- Not Defined -
GP Routine TATRefer to Website
Turnround CommentNA

Originally edited by : DT. Review due on 31/05/2018 09:34:36. Published By Sylvia McLellan on 31/05/2017 09:34:36.